Thursday, March 4, 2010

Teaching midwifery students about abdominal palpation

I have just come across a great teaching resource for teaching midwifery (nursing and medical) students about abdominal palpation, thanks to my colleague Rae Hickey.

This resource has been developed by the School of Nursing and Academic Division of Midwifery at the University of Nottingham. The resource walks you through how to carry out an abdominal palpation, justification, auscultation (listening to the baby's heart), and research that supports this particular procedure. Click here to go to the resource.

Do you know of any other online resources that can be used to educate midwifery students?

Image: My pregnant wife davhor's photostream
http://www.flickr.com/photos/davhor/3286969625/

13 comments:

Dot said...

At one of my home visits during my pregnancy with Frank the midwife got her student to practice palpation on me because, she said, I had a 'perfect tummy'. I was awfully flattered:-) I expect she meant Frank was very easy to feel.

It does strike me that for learning this kind of skill the possibilities of the internet are limited - until someone invents a three-dimensional screen that can be programmed to bulge in the right directions...

Sarah Stewart said...

You are absolutely right, Dot - nothing can replace the learning you do when you carry out this sort of skill in 'real' life. But the students still need a theoretical framework and this resource is slightly less 'dry' than a text book

flickabug said...

Sarah,
What a great link. Thank you for sharing it! I have found it very helpful. I'm on my first rotation of clinical next week as a student midwife and I am glad I have watched this as it will be fresh in my mind! (text books seem to get a little boring at times!)

Take Care

Thinkbirth said...

Thanks for sharing this link Sarah. Great idea. warmly, Carolyn

Sarah Stewart said...

Thanks Carolyn and Flickabug for your comments.

What I should have made clear in my post is that the University of Nottingham has led the way with this resource by putting it out on the Internet under a Creative Commons licence which means we can all reuse the resource (you'll have to check the terms of the licence). They have thrown down the challenge to the rest of us to do likewise with our education resources.

Good luck, Flickabug, with your first placement & let us know how you get on...and don't forget we're waiting to hear how you got on with your assignment on midwifery knowledge :)

Carolyn said...

Midwifery students from around the world will be benefiting from the generosity of Nottingham University making such learning resources freely available. I am trying to get as much of the work I am developing as I can up on Slideshare and other open access sites and will continue to do this. However there is quite a difference between the work that I can do and a resource such as this, which has clearly had some significant expertise involved in its creation. Well done Nottingham.

Sarah Stewart said...

Thank you Carolyn...and I have to say that what you have achieved with minimal resources is fabulous.

My vision is for midwifery schools to collaborate to develop learning objects such as this one, sharing time and financial resources - it's ridiculous that we're reinventing the wheel all the time - in this day of fiscal cutbacks and talk about sustainability, this sort of collaboration is a 'must'...to my mind.

Ruth Martis said...

A great resource that no doubt our midwifery students will find helpful. And yes, very generous indeed by the University to share it. Just to be nitpicking it would have been good to let go of the pinnard when listening to the FH and also include listening with a fetoscope, as that will enable the woman to hear the baby too and a doppler is then not always required.
Personally I would have liked to 'meet' the woman at the beginning and for the midwife to talk to her.
Regardless of my comments, a really great resource. Thank you.

Sarah Stewart said...

Here is another elearning package for abdominal palpation:

http://www.cetl.org.uk/learning/abdominal-examination/player.html

Linda said...

Hi,
I am a midwifery student and was wondering if there was any information or links you knew of about the origins of abdominal palpation.

Thanks!
Linda

katrine said...

Great link, thanks for posting. Another source of elearning for midwiferystudents is our site gynzone.net which offers evidence-based e-learning on perineal repair after vaginal deliveries

Sarah Stewart said...

But I think you need to point out, Katrine, that your resource is not free, which is fine. But I am only interested in resources that are freely and openly available.

Linda: good question. I cannot tell you off the top of my head - I'd have to go and have a look. I would say that midwives have always felt women's abdomens, but imagine it became a formal observation when ante natal care became formal in the 1920s. I'll have a look out and let you know if I find anything more concrete. What does Mayes and Miles say?

katrine said...

Ah, sorry, I didn't realise that you ment open-access ressources only. In that case, we have an info-section that is free of use at http://www.gynzone.net/women-s-health/for-all-women

Nucleus medical media also has some beautiful animations that are publicly available (with watermark)on their website and some on youtube. An example could be this piece on episiotomy http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4CtLGzBvv4.